Instrumentalist - Cello
Acclaim
 
Schubert String Quintet D. 956

"After intermission, cellist Colin Carr bolstered the ensemble for Schubert’s C Major 'cello' Quintet. Paul Watkins and Carr sounded sublime in the unique cello-duet theme, the entire opening movement doing exactly what Schubert intended, with its half-step motion, major/minor dualities, and two-sides-of-the-coin elements resulting in, as one audience member observed, 'going to nowhere', in the best sense. The adagio movement unfolded in textures both pastoral and religious, with a recapitulation in Beethoven fashion, when the combination of the two elements reveals them to be but half of the whole story. Lawrence Dutton’s viola sweetly sang over and amid the woody cello textures."

Patrick Valentino, The Boston Musical Intelligencer
J.S. Bach Cello Suites BWV 1007-1012

"His supreme technique gives him the freedom to hold together long complicated phrases that many more mortal cellists can’t manage without breaking their arcs. Carr’s pacing allows him to remind us of the suites’ roots in Baroque dance; his Courante movements have the brisk, steady flow that evokes the translation of the movement title ('running'). And with his bouncy, jig-like ebullience, Carr is better than anybody in the final Gigues."

James C.S. Liu, The Boston Musical Intelligencer
J.S. Bach Cello Suites BWV 1007-1012

"... Colin Carr’s phrasing and articulation are so precise yet carefully understated, and of a kind of total-acceptance simplicity, that the music is given space to sing ... at the same time as entering the room without any pomp.... this performance is a masterclass in restraint and musical altruism."

Caroline Gill, Gramophone
Chamber Music Society opens Baroque month with a feast of solo Bach

"... his performance [of Cello Suite No. 3 in C major] stands out as a memorable interpretation of what is truly a touchstone work in the cello repertoire. From the opening line of the Prelude, a blissful sigh, this was an absolutely exquisite reading, hinting at deep wisdom even when the music moved through rapid, flowing passagework. He gave an easy, breathing reading of the Allemande, and even the Courante showed a richness and fullness of sound in every note. The first Bourée was a simple expression of complete contentment, a sentiment echoed and amplified in Carr’s buoyant, joyful reading of the closing Gigue."

Eric C. Simpson, New York Classical Review
Chamber Music Society probes music of Adès and Britten

"This is Britten at his most profound, summoning deep, dark thoughts through aching melody, and Carr’s realization was profoundly moving."

Eric C. Simpson, New York Classical Review
Unveiling Beethoven's secrets

"From the opening solo in the C-major Sonata, the singing voice of Carr's cello shone like an illuminating source. Never forced or strained, his warmth of tone was a distinguishing feature."

Chang Tou Liang, Straits Times
Cel­list Carr puts his own stamp on Schumann

"Eng­lish cel­list Colin Carr wowed the crowd of 831 with a sear­ing per­form­ance of Schumann’s Cello Con­certo in A Minor, Op. 129, con­sidered one of the three great Romantic works of its kind in the cello repertoire... One might be temp­ted to describe Carr’s play­ing by bravura alone. He pos­sesses dazzling vir­tu­osic tech­nique, nimble bow­ing, an elo­quent vibrato and abil­ity to quickly scale the tonal heights of his instru­ment before plum­met­ing back to its chocolaty depths.

"How­ever, the soloist is also able to fully enter into the sound world of whatever he is play­ing, seem­ing to chan­nel the great artists of the past while adding his own per­sonal stamp."

Holly Harris, Winnipeg Free Press
Schubert’s Arpeggione Sonata in A Minor – Khoon Grand Series (Singapore)

“Today’s cellists claim it as their own, including Briton Colin Carr who brought out all the singing qualities on his Goffriller cello. His tone was warm and sumptuous, seamlessly gliding between passages of absolute cantabile and blissful elation in its three movements.”

Chang Tou Liang, Straits Times
Colin Carr's Lucid, Lively Bach at BoCo

"Carr’s musicianship and technical skills are impeccable; he can throw off long complicated runs at a breakneck pace, with apparent effortless ease.... The way Carr varies his phrasing and bowing helps to bring out the dance rhythms that inspired Bach’s music.... Carr played the highest notes with the same tonal security as the plunges down to the bottom of the register.

"Carr’s Olympian cello technique was deployed brilliantly to serve Bach with lucid clarity. Over and over again, I picked up connections between parallel movements in the three suites that I hadn’t noticed before.

"...in this most personal and exposed of music, he never milked a cadence, never paused to let a chord ring and reverberate before moving on to the next idea, lest it disrupt the momentum he had so carefully accumulated beforehand. I’m puzzled as to why a prodigious player like this doesn’t have a bigger following, and I wonder if the lack of ostentatious razzle-dazzle keeps him from reaching a wider audience."

James C.S. Liu, Boston Musical Intelligencer
Cello fest stars take final bow at jam-packed gala concert

"One of the brightest stars this year -- and there have been many -- has been award-winning English cellist Colin Carr. His infectious joy and ability to communicate seemingly every shade of emotion in whatever he is playing has consistently led to roaring standing ovations.

"...Carr showed us his own vision on Sunday with a deeply felt, and carefully considered, interpretation. The charismatic artist began simply, gradually building emotional intensity throughout the work’s four movements."

Holly Harris, Winnipeg Free Press

"Very often, the highest performance goal when performing the artistically demanding solo works of Bach is to impart a sublimity that seems to alter our perception of both how time passes and indeed of ourselves as perceivers of music through time. Bach, supremely-played, allows us to lose ourselves in the moment – an experience that can seem to last forever. Last Friday night, Mr. Carr’s at-times ethereal performance of the Bach Sixth Cello Suite attained the highest musical virtue, achieving the transportatively transcendental."

Read More...
Stephan Bonfield, Calgary Herald
JS Bach: Solo Cello Suites
"At no point in this dignified performance does Carr resort to 'oversharing' with the audience to make a point."
Caroline Gill, Gramophone
Colin Carr's Music@Menlo program: Bach, Kodaly
“Beginning with [Bach] Suite No. 3 in C major, Carr played with streaming clarity, bounding and bright. His earthy tone enriched the big splayed chords of the Prelude, the hopping rhythms of the Allemande, the expansive soulfulness of the Sarabande. The music was in his fingers. In fact, one could see Bach’s cascading logic -- its physical representation -- in Carr’s wily shifts in finger position and variety of bow attacks. … Dedicating his [Kodaly’s Sonata for Solo Cello] performance to the late János Starker, who put this piece on the map, Carr rooted into the sonata’s raw moans and ululations, shimmering pizzicato chords and volatile bass effects, which rattled the cello -- and the room. It was a terrific blood-and-guts performance that Bach could never have imagined.”

Richard Scheinin, San Jose Mercury News
BEETHOVEN: Complete Works for Cello and Piano - Colin Carr, cello/ Thomas Sauer, piano
“Carr plays with an exceptionally smooth sound, one of the smoothest on record, and that element of his tonal quality seems to set the stage for the overall feeling of the interpretations as a whole. He is not obsessed with overplaying the dramatic elements or any sort of overly-emotive representation of Beethoven’s subtle and sometimes gossamer melodic filigree. This is not to say that power is lacking, only that he is content to allow Beethoven’s muscularity sufficient to the cause at hand without overplaying his hand. Sauer also understands this and partners Carr with exceptional understanding and support. The sound is burnished and analog-like with fine digital clarity and spaciousness.”
Steven Ritter, Audiophile Audition
"This was a masterful and emotional rendition. After the famous adagio opening, the Henley Symphony Orchestra showed great skill in the answer-and-call moderato section of the first movement. And then we were sold, so that the rest was over far too quickly." Read More...
Lesley Potter, Henley Standard
"Carr played Suite Nos 2 and 3 (BWV 1008 and 1009) before the interval and his performing style did indeed suggest a man with nothing better to do – not in the sense that he’s killing time till something better comes along, but in his total immersion in the music, with a perfect balance of intensity and relaxation." Read More...
Matthew Zuckerman, Listomania Bath
Requiem performance a heartbreaking experience
“Colin Carr’s playing is rich and expressive.”
Ruth Allison, Fairfax News (NZ)
Satisfying Menu Sandwiched Two Dramatic Piano Trios Around a Sunny Duo
"Carr's seamless, steady playing of the difficult, glassy high harmonics of the opening was breathtaking and was one of the most satisfying I have heard."
William Thomas Walker, Classical Voice of North Carolina
"Carr has clearly lived and loved this music for some time, with every move and nuance borne out of instinct and familiarity. Crucially Sauer was on the same wavelength, for all of Beethoven's duo-sonatas treat their two participants on equal terms.... The pair's proximity and attention to detail counted for much - here was chamber music performed and enjoyed as it should be." Read More...
Ben Hogwood, ClassicalSource.com
CD Review: Spirited Mendelssohn From A Consummate Cellist
"Any disc by Colin Carr is an event and Cello Classics is to be congratulated on getting him and Thomas Sauer into the studio soon after the British cellist and American pianist played this music so persuasively at London's Wigmore Hall."
Tully Potter, The Strad
CD Review: Complete Works for Cello and Piano
"There's an impressive depth of tone to Colin Carr's sound, his phrasing is generous and his projection is outgoing. He also gives himself time to fit in the smallest-value notes, always played with poise, and he is accommodating of Thomas Sauer, whose pianism is similarly a fine blend of discretion and demonstration. What's more, the recording balances the musicians as equals and with immediacy."
Colin Anderson, International Record Review (UK)
Winnipeg cello convergence deserves an encore
"Although today's superstar of the cello, Yo-Yo Ma, found himself unable to attend, the Winnipeg event set a standard worthy of his presence, with performances such as Colin Carr's of the Haydn C Major Concerto with the Winnipeg Chamber Orchestra and Jian Wang's of the Shostakovich E Flat Major Concerto with the Winnipeg Symphony Orchestra under Alexander Mickelthwate brought audiences to their feet."
William Littler, Toronto Star
Full stage winds up cello festival
"Gifted U.K. artist Colin Carr played one of the jewels of the cello repertoire, Tchaikovsky's Variations on a Rococo Theme, guiding the orchestra himself. His instrument sang as he proceeded in a no-nonsense fashion with a great sense of urgency. Carr's phrasing was superb, his low register resonant, upper register pure and sweet. Equally adept at the scampering passages as he was in the flowing, textured lines, he gave this a high-energy performance that again earned a standing ovation."
Gwenda Nemerofsky, Winnipeg Free Press
Brahms, Mendelssohn & Schumann
"Colin Carr, striking a Kreislerianan figure on stage, did not disappoint. He seemed to be in direct contact with the inner meaning of the music. Completely engaged emotionally, the cello became his voice; a beautiful rich voice with depth to its timbre. The music was suitably charged; he hardly paused for breath between movements of ‘Phantasiestücke' and certainly heeded the direction ‘Mit Feuer.'"
Anna Michel, Musical Pointers (UK)
"Carr and Sauer, who have been partners in previous Four Seasons Chamber Music Festival programs, were completely up to the demands of the score and performed with great skill, letting the music breathe, while never crowding or rushing each other." Read More...
Steve Row, Classical Voice of North Carolina
Album Review: Clara Schumann
"Colin Carr's beauty of tone makes for ravishing listening here. A chromatic line opens the Allegretto finale, the development pure Mendelssohn but tempered by an independent, deft spirit. The almost obligatory fugato proceeds in light but learned terms, without having broken the mood of rapt elegant ardor."
Gary Lemco, Audiophile Audition
"Carr took a distinct approach to each composer and, indeed, to each piece. In Mendelssohn's First Cello Sonata, his sound was rich and mellow; for Schumann's Adagio and Allegro, anxious and penetrating; and intense and chocolaty for Brahms's First Cello Sonata. In every case, Carr made the cello seem inevitably suited for this romantic literature." Read More...
Gail Wein, Classical Source
Joshua Gindele and Colin Carr
"The highlight of the evening was a stunning performance of Vivaldi’s Concerto in G Minor for Two Cellos, Strings and Continuo. Cello soloists Colin Carr and Joshua Gindele delved into the challenging musical dialog with gusto. They matched volume and phrasing brilliantly and the echoing passages and devil-may-care runs up and down the fingerboard were outstanding." Read More...
James Bash, The Gathering Note
"Carr is open to new challenges, curious about the world, ever fascinated with his chosen profession.... All these traits were palpable during Friday's concert. Carr played spectacularly, his cello sounded gorgeously, and his interpretation was full of poetry and subtlety." Read More...
Dorota Gonet, Gazeta Wuborcza (Lublin, Poloand)
"Carr performed something that is not often heard in Hong Kong - an entire cello recital of solo Bach. The sweeping opening from the Prelude of the third Suite in C major filled City Hall Concert Hall with Carr's beautiful sound and instantly drew the audience in. It was immediately apparent that this was no ordinary Bach playing, but an original and highly personal interpretation. The phrases melted into each other with an inevitable momentum that never became bogged down or self-inflated with each individual phrase or motive." Read More...
Jessica Bruser, Time Out Hong Kong
Total: 41 (Viewing: 1–30)